Date

Sunday, April 21 2024 – Sunday, July 07 2024
Ongoing…

Time

7:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Cost

$300

Labels

Integral Yoga Presents,
Online

Date

Sunday, April 21 2024 – Sunday, July 07 2024
Ongoing…

Cost

$300

Time

7:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Labels

Integral Yoga Presents,
Online

Teacher

  • Rasathi
    Rasathi

    Rasathi is the owner of the brand Rasath1 and is the host of the NightOwl Podcast. Born in Singapore but raised around the world, she is an international coach and speaker and specializes in Emotional & Relational Intelligence. Rasathi believes that people skills are essential in today’s world and takes great pride in her ability to combine logic and emotion to help her clients restore both confidence, dignity and symbiosis in all their relationships. Her experience includes counseling people through difficulties such as addiction recovery, anger management, depression and anxiety disorders, couples mediation, generational parenting, conflict resolution, and teambuilding and management.

Location

Integral Yoga New York
Integral Yoga New York
227 W. 13th Street

Program Description

Raja Yoga is one of the 6 branches of Integral Yoga and is generally described as the goal of experiencing bliss by achieving an undisturbed natural state. The primary text for Raja Yoga is the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali which our Beloved Sri Swami Satchidananda lovingly translated. This course will focus on the first 2 of the eight practices as described within the Yoga Sutras: The Yamas and Niyamas. Join us as we deep dive into values such as Kindness, Honesty, Resourcefulness, Willpower, Discipline, Awareness, and Faith and how each shows up in our relationships with the world around us. Within the practices of the Yamas and Niyamas, lies a practical way to enhance your relationships and enrich your life. Discover how Raja Yoga can be applied to achieve a healthful mental and emotional well-being.

Each session of this 12 week course will focus on a different topic as follows:

  1. Yamas & Niyamas – The 5 Yamas (restraints) and 5 Niyamas (observances) as described by Patanjali in his Yoga Sutras are a set of ethical guidelines to help us achieve both inner and outer peace. Together they make up the first 2 limbs of the 8-fold path. While Patanjali doesn’t specify exactly HOW to apply these ideas, there is a promise of harmony within each person and among each other if taken seriously individually. Yamas are considered a set of social ethics which prevents conflict in Man vs Man or Man vs Group connections. Niyamas are considered a set of personal ethics to prevent conflict in a Man vs Himself connection. While the Yoga Sutras are an ancient Hindu text, we will explore how these practices are still applicable in our everyday interactions even now. The Yamas are guidelines towards harmony and connection within a community and free us from becoming victims of our own impulses. The Niyamas, similarly, are guidelines for harmony and confidence within oneself can prevent us from becoming a slave to our emotions.
  2. Ahimsa – Most people associate nonviolence with the practice of Ahimsa and the direct translation from Sanskrit is “absence of injury” but what if there is more to this idea. Ahimsa requires an intentional practice of courage, balance, love of self, and compassion for others. Let’s discuss what non-violence or “kindness” looks like in today’s world. Does non-violence only refer to behavior or do thoughts and speech count? What is the difference between nice and kind? Can you wish ill on someone you empathize with? How are empathy and vulnerability relevant to an Ahimsa practice?
  3. Satya – In Sanskrit, Satya means truth. In 2024, there is a need to distinguish between opinion or perspective and fact. What is true for me may not be true in another person’s experience. So how do we manage to recognize and accept that many truths can co-exist simultaneously. How does one person manage so much possibility? What if we focused on our part in this larger picture? Why do people lie? Is speaking the truth enough? Is integrity the same as truth? What part do assumptions play in our day to day life? Can holding myself accountable for my thoughts and actions be enough?
  4. Asteya – The loose translation of Asteya as a practice refers to the virtue of not stealing or not taking anything that is not freely offered. The commandments had a similar principle – Thou Shalt Not Steal. But what if there is more to this practice than simply “not coveting that which is not yours.” Set aside material possessions and consider the intangible aspects of this idea. What roles do desire and gratitude play? How do fear and dissatisfaction factor into the idea of Asteya? How does Satya connect to Asteya? If Asteya is about abundance, how does respect fit in?
  5. Aparigraha – Aparigraha often translates to greed with relation to hoarding but can also be interpreted as non attachment. This practice teaches us to only take what we need in the moment, keep what is essential and let go when the time comes. Consider how much is enough in all aspects of our lives as we live it today. From basics like food, shelter, clothing to luxuries like entertainment and comforts, how much do we truly need? What does it mean to be attached? What does it mean to be resourceful? Can I sustain my life with less? How does anxiety and fear affect our ability to live in the moment and be unattached?
  6. Brahmacharya – The term Brahmacharya is most often associated with a monk’s life. Concepts like celibacy, non attachment to worldly possession, a minimalistic life devoid of temptation come to mind. But is there a way to practice Brahmacharya in our own householder lives? What does it mean to live in moderation? What does self restraint look like? How do we take care of the self without falling into selfishness or become trapped by selflessness? How do we process the emotions that follow establishing boundaries for a simple life?
  7. Saucha – This practice is about cleanliness and is more intently observed during auspicious occasions and in preparation for devotional practices such as Fasting month and before undertaking penance like vows. But what would this practice look like as a lifestyle? What is considered clean vs dirty? What is the difference between purity versus cleanliness? Where do we accumulate dirt? What does the purification process look like?
  8. Santosha – Swamiji used to explain Santosha as a natural state of contentment much like still waters or an undisturbed state. Today, with information almost smothering us, it is increasingly difficult to recognize contentment much less return to an undisturbed state. The rippled disturbances begin and end with a phone in our hands whether from notifications, messages, calls or scrolling. How then do we create space for contentment? How do we begin to recognize it and then recreate? How do we achieve balance after a disturbance?
  9. Tapas – Between dream and reality lies the concept of Tapas. Where Satya allows us to draw boundaries between each other to protect ourselves, Tapas teaches us the line between indulgence and discipline to ensure our evolution and therefore survival. This ‘internal fire’ is necessary to help clear away habits that no longer serve us as we evolve. Tapas is the intentional step out of comfort into growth and often comes with grief and pain. Recognizing the need for change, processing what it will take and holding yourself accountable with each choice takes a lot of Satya and Ahimsa within yourself. What does grace under fire look like as a process? How do you process guilt, shame and grief?
  10. Swadhyaya – The practice of self study or self awareness requires a state of observing. Meditation as a practice can bring you into this state so that you can observe the truth of your thoughts and how those thoughts influence your decisions and also your behavior. What can you learn from awareness? What is possible with this observed data? How does Swadhyaya help us become more effective in our Yama practices?
  11. Iswara Pranidhana – The practice of Iswara Pranidhana is about surrender and detachment. The art of being present without attachment to a specific outcome or reward. To accept what is. Is it really possible to have “no appointments” as Swamiji suggested and thereby have “no disappointments?” Is unconditional love possible in action? What would it look like to achieve this level of acceptance? Does being detached mean that you don’t care?
  12. Yamas, Niyamas, & Mental Health – Swamiji used to speak about how “Dis- Ease” is the disturbance of one’s natural ease – is the cause of disease, so prevention and restoration are the hallmarks of Integral Yoga practices. Can simple practices such as the Yamas and Niyamas as a lifestyle actually prevent or restore ease in daily life? How does one manage internal change? How does internal change affect our environments? What does environment mean for mental health? Let’s consider a few case studies for clarity.

This is an online course.

Register for all 12 sessions at a discounted price, or drop in to individual sessions.

All sessions will be recorded and available on demand.

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